Graduate Student Organizations

Graduate Representative Organization (GRO)

The GRO is the representative organization for graduate students belonging to the Homewood campus of JHU from both the School of Engineering as well as the School of Arts and Sciences. The GRO consists of graduate students, GC council members who function as department representatives, and an executive board. Members of the E-Board act as liaisons between graduate students and administration to advocate for graduate student needs and we host different types of social events through the year for graduate students.

For more information visit their website, or email gro@jhu.edu.

List of Recognized Groups

The GRO is the University’s official body for recognition of graduate student campus groups and reviews applications received by SLI. Please visit the GRO website for full list of recognized student groups.

For more information regarding each group, please visit that group’s page on the Hopkins campus groups website.

Other Groups

Women of Whiting (WoW)

Women of Whiting (WOW) is a rapidly growing group composed of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows dedicated to providing women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields with community building, networking, mentorship, and professional development opportunities.

The Graduate Queer-Straight Alliance

The Graduate Queer-Straight Alliance supports graduate students in and around Homewood. Students may also like to explore the LGBTQ Life website for more information about what’s happening to support the LGBTQ communities at Hopkins.

Mentoring to Inspire Diversity in Science (MInDS)

MInDS is an organization that promotes diversity in science by fostering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in their career development. MInDS works with Faculty and Administration to develop effective strategies to identify, recruit, retain and support underrepresented groups. Through mentorship, networking, and improving community awareness, MInDs contributes to the universal effort to diversify academic researchers at colleges.